Domesday

Domesday Book 1086

The following is a translation of the entries for Wold Newton made in 1870 by Charles Gowen Smith and extracted from his book entitled “Domesday Book which relates to Lincolnshire and Rutlandshire.”  A glossary of terms used in this translation can be found as subpages linked within the text.

 

                                   THE LAND OF THE BISHOP OF DURHAM.

Two Manors.  In NEWTON-LE-WOLD (NEVTONE) Grinchel had eleven bovates of land rateable to gelt: the land is two carucates.  Walbert, the Bishop’s vassal, has there one carucate, and two villeins and two bordars with half a carucate.  There is a church, and forty acres of meadow;  and in THORGANBY (TURGRIBI) a mill and ten acres of meadow, which Norman de Arcy wrongfully holds.  The annual value in King Edward’s time was 100s.;  it is now 30s.  There is a Hall here with toft, and sac, and soke.

                                                 THE LAND OF EARL ALAN.

Soke [of this Manor.]  In WOLD-NEWTON (NEUTONE) there are three carucates and half a bovate of land rateable to gelt: the land is five carucates.  Twenty sokeman and two bordars have there four carucates.

Four Manors.  In the same WOLD NEWTON Ingemund and three of his brothers had three bovates of land rateable to gelt:  the land is one carucate.  Wimund, the Earl’s vassal, has there one carucate.

                           THE LAND OF SORTIBRAND AND OTHER THANES.

Manor.  In NEWTON-LE-WOLD (NEUTONE) Justan had three bovates of land rateable to gelt:  the land is one carucate.  The same [person now] has it, and it is waste.  The annual value in King Edward’s time was 5s. 4d.

                       THE CLAIMS AND THEIR SETTLEMENT BY THE JURORS.

                                       CLAIMS IN THE NORTH RIDING [OF LINDSEY.]

...  The Wapentake-men [further] say that Earl Alan ought to have Soke over the Hall of Grinchel, whose land the Bishop of Durham has in NEWTON-LE-WOLD.  Colswain did not release the land of Ingemund and his brother to Earl Alan, but Ingemund put the same under the protection of the Earl on account of other land he held under him.