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Carucate

CARUCATE (or carucate terrae, plough-land) means a quantity of land, but conveys to us no certainty of measurement;  yet the people in olden times were often taxed by the carucate or carve of land, which might contain houses, mills, woods, pastures, &c.  Skene says it contains as great a portion of land as may be laboured and tilled in a year and a day by one plough, and is the same in quantity as the hide of land.  The hide of land and the carucate of land are estimated to contain one hundred and twenty acres each.  Carucates only are the measurements mentioned in Lincolnshire.  Carucate is the word I have taken to represent the the plough-team, as well as the plough-land.

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